Jessica Leandra dos Santos has become an example of how not to use social networks

I am certain that Jessica Leandra dos Santos could not imagine what was going to follow from her ill-considered tweet, posted on the 3rd of May, where she used the word “kaffir” in her rant about some Black man who apparently committed an act of sexual harassment against her in an unnamed Spar retail outlet.

This tweet generated over 5 000 responses from a combination of related keywords – “kaffir”, “racist tweet” and “FHM model”.

Responses to Jessica Leandra dos Santos' k-word tweet

Responses to Jessica Leandra dos Santos’ k-word tweet

As can be imagined in the still deeply divided South African society; there were many responses denouncing her, while a few others supported her. Some provided a different perspective, shown in this blog.

See screen shots of 5 responding tweets that got most tongues wagging, below. Be warned that the content of these tweets is not edited, and unfortunately one of them uses fairly crude language:

Most RT'd response to K-word tweet

Most RT’d response to K-word tweet

2nd most RT'd response to K-word tweet

2nd most RT’d response to K-word tweet

3rd most RT'd response to K-word tweet

3rd most RT’d response to K-word tweet

4th most RT'd response to K-word tweet

4th most RT’d response to K-word tweet

4th most RT'd response to K-word tweet

5th most RT’d response to K-word tweet

Two Twitter usual suspects – DJFresh and KhayaDlanga – weighed in on the matter, and their followers joined in the fray. As the FHM tweet above shows, Jessica’s 140 characters of fame on Twitter lost her a modeling deal. You can read more about  the aftermath of this K-word tweet here.

Click here to read about how Social media are blurring the line between private and professional lives 

There is a clear lesson here. Think, before you even begin to say anything on social networks. Better yet, stay away when you are in a moment of rage. Taking back the 140 characters after posting them may be too late, as Jessica has now come to learn (ouch!).

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9 thoughts on “Jessica Leandra dos Santos has become an example of how not to use social networks

  1. Pingback: Social Media Just Killed A Model, In Fact, Make That Two… « Ojaytee's Blog

  2. There is this Twitter Rule that Jessica probably doesn’t know. Actually it is a Social Media Rule: If you wouldn’t say in person face to face don’t say it on Social Media.

  3. I feel for her. Yes, one tweeter was spot on when they said the one mistake she made was make a public declaration that she is racist. Deleting the tweet and making an apology doesn’t make her less racist.

    The reason I feel for her is that I do not think she ever imagined the repecursions. Is her career ruined? Can she even step out of her front door? Her sentiments were clearly not well thought and immature. As a Christian one can appreciate the verses, ‘do not act in anger lest you sin’.

    We all get upset occasionally and most of us hide ‘monsters’ within our personalities that we would never reveal willingly / consciously. Whilst I do not condone her ranting nor think it was justified, surely there must be room for compassion – allowing the individual to learn and grow from the experience. She is young and like most of us is still registered at the school of life, with lots of hard knocks in wait.

    • Mhh, read that one too and had the same thought… But then other race fueled incidents that took place within the past 12 months came to mind with one common denominator – technology being the unforgiving recorder and disseminator of information.

      I am willing to bet that in years gone by worse racial crime was committed but the exposure thereof was controlled. With technology once it’s out there, there’s little, if anything, that can be done to undo some of the damage. From then it’s viral…

      The good side is the awareness of existing individual intolerance that is revealed and the subsequent checking of own stereotyping and general social tolerance.

      I think exposing the unrelated and perhaps isolated incidents is good in encouraging responsible behavior.

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